Monthly Archives: March 2016

Lillian in Assets Finds Work, Home and Hope

Lillian had been homeless for twelve years when she arrived at DECSA exhausted and discouraged. She was facing mental and emotional health challenges, and she was more than ready to find some stability. “I was broken, and I was trying to hide it, but I felt like I wasn’t worth anything,” she says.

Through our Assets for Success program, Lillian started to find her feet again. “Everyone at DECSA believed in me. They kept telling me I deserved something better, and I could get there.” The Assets team worked with her to gain several certificates and credentials that would show employers her credibility and open doors for Lillianconsistent work. She completed training in First Aid/CPR, ProServe, construction safety, Workplace Hazardous Materials, Medical Administration, and Applied Suicide Intervention Skills.

Then, with guidance from the Assets team, she found work as a Personal Care Aide in a group home for children, so now she is using her skills and strengths to serve kids who face challenges.

Lillian received the financial aid she needed to rent an apartment, and she has been able to furnish it through donations from one of DECSA’s connections. Now Lillian is settling into her new life.

“I get up in the morning, and I look out my window, and I’m facing a lake! Last year I was homeless. Now I am in awe, and I’ll be grateful forever to DECSA because I’d lost hope in myself and they kept telling me I could get on my feet again. They believed in me, and I feel like they gave me back myself.”

We are so proud of Lillian, who has showed herself to be brave, determined, hard-working, and very capable. Congratulations, Lillian!

Researchers Say, “Being vulnerable improves mental health.”

Dark FaceEvery day at DECSA, we work with people who are living with shame because of differences they have, experiences they’ve had, and choices they’ve made.
We all live with shame, and it’s frightening to be vulnerable about the weak and damaged parts of ourselves, so we keep our secrets hidden.

But Brene Brown, a researcher who has been studying shame and vulnerability for over ten years, says, “Shame derives its power from being unspeakable…If we speak shame, it begins to wither.” Her research has shown that people actually become mentally healthier when they are vulnerable, and other researchers agree. Ziyad Marar, another scientist who has studied vulnerability says that the “shared and forgiving sense of frailty” that comes from being honest “is redemptive in a way that nothing else can be.”

At DECSA, we’re creating a place where people can honestly share their stories and find mental and emotional healing through vulnerability and acceptance because we know people need a place to be real.

In conclusion, we’d like to challenge you to ask yourself two questions today: “What parts of myself am I hiding?” and “Who can I be real with?” By being vulnerable, you free yourself to be yourself, and you give others courage to do the same.